Personal info

  • Name: William ANGUS
  • D.O.B: 28th Feb, 1888
  • D.O.A: 15th Jun, 1915
  • D.O.D: 14th Jun, 1959
  • Award: Victoria Cross
  • Occupation at time of action: Lance Corporal, 8th Battalion The Highland Light Infantry, attached to 1st/8th Battalion The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment), 22nd Brigade, 7th Division
  • Book: The Complete History - Volume 2
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Sources & Acknowledgements

North of Givenchy, France 12 June 1915

12 June 1915

More details about:
The First World War 1915 

In early June 1915 the Royal Scots had been involved in fighting at Givenchy, south of Festubert, for possession of a crater created by a British mine. An attempt to recapture the crater on the 11th had been frustrated by the detonation of a German mine. Lieutenant James Martin was thought to have been killed in the assault, but next morning was observed lying close to the German trenches about 50 yards away. As he began to crawl towards the British line he was shot. Lance Corporal W Angus volunteered to rescue him. Crawling out with a rope, he managed to reach Martin. Though himself wounded in the left eye by a bomb, he fixed his rope to Martin’s waist and they began the journey back. Angus took a different route from Martin so as to draw fire from him. Both reached the British line, though Angus himself was badly injured and also lost the sight of his right eye.

Citation

 For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty at Givenchy on the 12th June, 1915, in voluntarily leaving his trench under very heavy bomb and rifle fire, and rescuing a wounded Officer who was lying within a few yards of the enemy’s position. Lance-Corporal Angus had no chance whatever in escaping the enemy’s fire when undertaking this very gallant action, and in effecting the rescue he sustained about 40 wounds from bombs, some of them being very serious. 

The London Gazette of 29 June 1915, Numb. 29210, p. 6269

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